Jim Pumarlo, Community Newspaper Training
 
 

Look beyond the immediate news, and stay relevant

Categorized under:

Publishers' Auxiliary/April 2013

Many newspapers do a great job of looking in the rearview mirror, and that used to be adequate for inviting readers into their pages. The old formula doesn’t work anymore if community newspapers are to remain relevant. The changing media landscape, coupled with the demands on readers’ time, require that newsrooms pay just as much attention looking ahead and around as to looking back.

Let me explain.

The first step for meaningful business reports? Make them understandable

Categorized under:

By Jim Pumarlo

Your newsroom has just finished brainstorming on how to beef up its business reporting. The conversation happens to be at the same time your newspaper has a major announcement itself. What better opportunity to signal to your readers a new page in local business reporting.

The headline: “Publisher announces the call for redemption of all its public debt”

Take inventory of your newsmakers

Categorized under:

By Jim Pumarlo

Here’s an action item for your next newsroom meeting: Ask reporters to identify the community newsmakers. Better yet, bring a stack of newspapers from the last couple of months and circle the newsmakers receiving attention in words and photos.

Use your platform to educate, preview - and apologize

Categorized under:

Publishers’ Auxiliary/February 2013

A reader questions your policy for reporting suicides. A local retailer challenges your staff to produce timely and relevant business news.  A reporter is confronted for printing a press release charging a candidate with unfair campaign practices without contacting the accused for a response.

All of these scenarios are excellent topics for newsroom discussion. And most editors will likely respond directly to the individuals who raise the questions.

Elections are over – so keep covering them

Categorized under:

The Inlander/December 2012

The 2012 elections are in the rearview mirror. Newly elected lawmakers will soon assume their duties, and newsrooms are returning to normalcy, however that is defined these days. For most editors and reporters, the next cycle of elections is the farthest thing from their minds.

Not so quick.

Dos and don’ts for the election countdown

Categorized under:

Publishers’ Auxiliary/October 2012

Don’t fear. The exhausting election season is nearing an end. Your newsrooms are soon to return to normalcy – still chaotic, but at least a little more organized.

Elections are one of the most scrutinized areas of coverage, especially if newspapers have a strong editorial voice. Editors and reporters are well aware of the political passions – just log your phone calls, e-mails and visits from candidates as well as their supporters and detractors.

Take inventory of your newsmakers

Categorized under:

Publishers’ Auxiliary/September 2012

Here’s an action item for your next newsroom meeting: Ask reporters to identify the community newsmakers. Better yet, bring a stack of newspapers from the last couple of months and circle the newsmakers receiving attention in words and photos.

Customer service is job one for newsrooms, too

Categorized under:

The Inlander/September 2012

Customer service is the byword as businesses navigate today’s challenging economy. At newspapers, that means paying attention to details in all aspects of the operation - everything from prompt service for advertisers to efficient turnaround on submitted news briefs to on-time newspaper delivery.

No room for slow news days with a well-planned editorial calendar

Categorized under:

The Inlander/August 2012

We’re in the dog days of summer, which often are accompanied by a slowdown in news. More than a few editors likely are challenged to generate substantive content. It’s time to turn to your editorial calendars.

Websites, social media integral to everyday coverage

Categorized under:

Publishers' Auxiliary/July 2012

The newspaper is just off the presses, and your photographer is dispatched to a fatal accident scene. The mayor gives an inspiring State of the City speech; your story in the next day’s edition captures the highlights, but time and space do not allow any attention to the details. Newspapers deliver blow-by-blow stories of election campaigns, but casual readers fail to grasp the continuum of coverage.


Pumarlo.com • Jim Pumarlo • Community Newsroom Success Strategies • 1327 W. Sixth St. • Red Wing, MN • 55066 • (651) 380-4295